daVinci_Yak-9U

The Yakovlev Yak-9 (Russian: Яковлев Як-9) was a single-engine single-seat multipurpose fighter aircraft used by the Soviet Union in World War II and after. Fundamentally a development of the robust and successful Yak-7B fighter based in turn on a tandem-seat advanced trainer Yak-7UTI, the Yak-9 arrived to Soviet fighter aviation regiments at the Stalingrad Front in December 1942 and played a major role in taking air superiority over Luftwaffe aces on the new Focke-Wulf Fw 190 and Messerschmitt Bf 109G fighters during the grand Battle of Kursk in summer 1943.

The Yak-9 had a lowered rear fuselage decking and all-around vision canopy. Its lighter metal longerons gave the new fighter a potential to increase fuel load and armament that previous models with wooden airframe had lacked.[2] The maneuverable, high-speed at low/medium altitudes and easy to control Yak-9 was one of the best and the most mass-produced Soviet fighter of World War II. It was produced in different variants including the Yak-9T with the 37 mm and the “large-calibre” Yak-9K with the 45 mm cannon firing through propeller hub to be effectively used against enemy tanks and aircraft, the fighter-bomber Yak-9B with the inner hanger behind cockpit of up to 400 kg bombs, the long-range Yak-9D and the Yak-9DD with additional wing fuel tanks to escort Allied bombers over Eastern Europe, the Yak-9U with the more powerful engine and improved aerodynamics. The Yak-9 remained in production from 1942 to 1948, with 16,769 built (14,579 during the war).

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The Yakovlev Yak-9 (Russian: Яковлев Як-9) was a single-engine single-seat multipurpose fighter aircraft used by the Soviet Union in World War II and after. Fundamentally a development of the robust and successful Yak-7B fighter based in turn on a tandem-seat advanced trainer Yak-7UTI, the Yak-9 arrived to Soviet fighter aviation regiments at the Stalingrad Front in December 1942 and played a major role in taking air superiority over Luftwaffe aces on the new Focke-Wulf Fw 190 and Messerschmitt Bf 109G fighters during the grand Battle of Kursk in summer 1943.

The Yak-9 had a lowered rear fuselage decking and all-around vision canopy. Its lighter metal longerons gave the new fighter a potential to increase fuel load and armament that previous models with wooden airframe had lacked.[2] The maneuverable, high-speed at low/medium altitudes and easy to control Yak-9 was one of the best and the most mass-produced Soviet fighter of World War II. It was produced in different variants including the Yak-9T with the 37 mm and the “large-calibre” Yak-9K with the 45 mm cannon firing through propeller hub to be effectively used against enemy tanks and aircraft, the fighter-bomber Yak-9B with the inner hanger behind cockpit of up to 400 kg bombs, the long-range Yak-9D and the Yak-9DD with additional wing fuel tanks to escort Allied bombers over Eastern Europe, the Yak-9U with the more powerful engine and improved aerodynamics. The Yak-9 remained in production from 1942 to 1948, with 16,769 built (14,579 during the war).

Developers

Vodoun daVinci, Detlef Faber, The FGUK Development Team with Stuart Cassie and Geed, Emmanuel Baranger, featuring a 3d Model from Fly Away Simulations!

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